Color marketing- colored pencils

Luck Has Nothing To Do With It

As a marketer, you have no doubt taken a class or read a blog that discusses how the use of color in design can help drive marketing results. If you haven’t just check out this article on The Psychology of Color in Marketing and Branding. Color is no joke in the marketing world; some would even argue that it is overanalyzed at times.

Unfortunately for the naysayers, the use of color in design has proven time and again to be an important and motivating marketing element. If you’re still on the fence about whether or not you should be investing some time to discuss your brand and website colors, here is a breakdown of five “whys” and “hows” that help explain the basic ways that color can drive results and change your marketing analytics.


WHY: Color triggers emotions.

HOW: Humans associate the colors they see with their own personal memories, and transfer those memory’s emotions to the brand that displays those emotions. Of course, you can’t universally connect with color; some people might hate yellow, whether or not it has proved to motivate purchasing. Colors in your design aren’t working alone; you are pairing them with font styles and sizes, as well as element size and placement, to appropriately motivate your audience.

WHY: Color motivates purchases.

HOW: One of the main reasons that people feel motivated to click on buttons or to make purchases is because the use of design elements – like color – create a persona and an atmosphere that is relatable; the audience either feels as though they are already a part of that group, or they aspire to get there.

WHY: Color can connect us to a cause.

HOW: Whether it is a battle of the sexes or political party affiliation, humans respond to certain colors that connect them to causes. Those colors and causes spark something – fear, anger, empathy – that results in action. We might feel that taking action will bring us closer to a cause, make us feel some kind of satisfaction, or even be a burn to someone that is against the cause.

WHY: Color connection is intuitive.

HOW: All this talk about how color connects us to our emotions and some primal motivation makes the experience seem complicated, but it’s the opposite; our connection to color is intuitive. Even before someone registers the words on a call-to-action button, they see what color that button is. Marketers often find that “real-world” color applications don’t translate to design; where in the real world green means ‘go,’ it might stop people from clicking a button on a website. This is because the reaction to the color is emotional and intuitive, not practical.

WHY: Color denotes direction.

HOW: Color – used in design elements or for font – is meant to stand out, and that core function is what helps it lead visitors through a page. Combining common left to right website viewing tendencies with directional color elements can create a pattern of visual hierarchy and serve as a roadmap for your audience’s journey.

For more on how to use color, be sure to read: How To Use Color To Communicate Your Message.